Posts by Carly Muetterties

Trust, But Verify: Student Responsibility in Inquiry

As much as I love all my students, when I became a teacher, I quickly learned some of the necessary boundaries of that trust. It’s a “trust, but verify” approach. I want to see evidence that they mean what they say. Once a dog ate a student’s assignment and she brought in the remnants as […]

Talking and Listening with “Strangers”

Lately, I’ve been grappling with how scholars, teachers, and policymakers define “citizenship” and, consequently, “citizenship education.” One thing I found was the prevalence of individualized notions of citizenship in curriculum – meaning when students think about acting as a democratic citizen, it is often in terms of the individual’s rights, freedoms, and actions, rather than […]

Eliminating Classroom Activities

One of the joys of teaching is interacting with students who have not quite mastered particular social graces, such as politeness or tact. Early in my teaching career, I had a student tell me individually what she really thought of our class. She did not mean to be insulting – but she definitely wasn’t complementing […]

Social Studies and Statues

Unless you have isolated yourself from all forms of media (or human interaction), you have seen the topic of historical memory being discussed, specifically within the context of Confederate monuments. Though I don’t generally shy away from political discussions, I usually keep mum on social media. I would much rather discuss these things in-person. When […]

Bridled Learning: Grabbing the Reins Through Inquiry

For my fourth summer, I spent the last six weeks teaching with Kentucky’s Governor’s Scholars Program. I’ve written about my past summers in previous posts. (“Practicing Citizenship,” “Acting Like a Citizen,” “Being C3Minded…”). What makes this program special for a teacher is that it is a highly competitive academic program, but once accepted, the scholars […]

Stay Intellectually Curious this Summer with C3-Minded Podcasts

Now that summer is here, the pressures of the school year are alleviated, at least partially. I can finally tackle my to-read pile! Though as a sufferer of tsundoku—a Japanese word meaning I have a problem with buying books that stack up, but not reading them—the stack of books will likely remain pretty high. One […]

Letting Students Wrestle with Inquiry Writing

“Only by wrestling with the conditions of the problem at first hand, seeking and finding his own way out, does he think.” John Dewey (1914)   I’ve often heard Kathy Swan use this quote when she has talked to teachers or students about the inquiry process.   If you peruse the C3 Teachers site for more […]

Embracing Stupidity

Being a student again is a humbling experience. It reminds me of one of my favorite jokes from comedian Mike Birbiglia: “When I was younger and would make mistakes I would say, ‘well, I was young and stupid.’ Now all I can say is ‘I’m stupid.’” Feeling like you don’t understand something can be incredibly […]

The Sweet Spot: The In-Between of Taking Informed Action

Since joining the C3Teacher team, I have written a lot of blog posts about the Taking Informed Action piece. I became a teacher for a love of the content, but my passion has increasingly become the way social studies can empower students to act. In the last couple months, being an engaged citizen has taken […]

C3 Next Steps: Hubs and Exchange

During the National Council for Social Studies’ Annual Conference in Washington, DC, the C3 team held two meetings at the National Museum of the American Indian. Here, we met with strategic partners to discuss the C3 Hubs and the C3 Exchange, respectively. This is an important next step for C3 Teachers. We are not only […]