Reflections on the C3

From Inquiry to Curriculum

After three years of working with the C3 Frameworks, I have a collection of American History inquiries that make students curious and open to new ideas.  Recently, I wondered: how do I tie these together into a curriculum? The essential questions of our curriculum remain valuable as a broad overview of our content goals for […]

What Should We Do About Fake News?

In our instant gratification, social media run world, fake news has become an epidemic plaguing the nation and our classrooms. A year-long study at Stanford University looked at students’ ability to reason about the information on the internet. The results were shocking. “Many people assume that because young people are fluent in social media that […]

Embracing Stupidity

Being a student again is a humbling experience. It reminds me of one of my favorite jokes from comedian Mike Birbiglia: “When I was younger and would make mistakes I would say, ‘well, I was young and stupid.’ Now all I can say is ‘I’m stupid.’” Feeling like you don’t understand something can be incredibly […]

The Cold War of Inquiry

I am often faced with an internal “ideological battle” about my instruction in my World History class especially towards the end of the semester.  Coincidentally enough, this ideological battle seems to “heat up” around Unit 8, the Cold War. Do I rely on direct instruction to make sure I “cover” the final content (Cold War […]

Reflections from a Novice C3 Teacher

This semester I took the plunge and completed my first C3 lesson with my government class. I designed the inquiry as part of a summer curriculum project last July for our social studies department in Fairfax County.  (You can find it here: To What Extent Do Americans Distrust the Process for Making Public Policy?) At our […]

The Limits of Inquiry

One thing the C3 Teacher team hears over and over when we introduce IDM to teachers is how they like the idea of it, but think they can only use it for certain classes: only advanced levels or for older grades or for one well-behaving class versus another, etc. Whatever qualification you want to use […]

C3 and PBL: A (Taking) Informed (Action) Crosswalk

History literally means “inquiry.” I always love seeing teachers’ reactions when I share this insight in conversations about instruction, or during workshops, or whenever I get the chance to really. I have noticed that this somewhat trivial piece of information elicits an “A-Ha!” moments which, to some extent, reframes the teaching and learning in their […]

In Defense of Studying the Social Studies

The Inquiry Design Model – Conceptual Principles: Promote Literacy Practices and Outcomes As someone employed in a social studies field, you are aware of how studying one of these disciplines is often discouraged, undervalued, and even, the butt of jokes. AND sometimes the attacks come from people IN social studies-related fields. For example, in April, Kentucky’s […]

Recipe for Inquiry: Learning to DO SOMETHING

The Inquiry Design Model – Conceptual Principles: Disciplinary knowledge and skills are integrated within an investigation I have stopped buying my niece and nephew presents. I know, I know. I’m a horrible aunt, right? What I do instead is give them each a coupon for a date with their Aunt Carly to do whatever they […]

The C3 Framework and Market Based Reforms

It has been a long time since I have written a blog post on C3 teachers however, my examination into the framework has continued. Along the way I’ve become interested in how the C3 Framework interacts with the market-based reform movement that has grown to become the standard for education reform. In this post, I […]