These teachers have what it takes to write a C3 Inquiry!

The 2016 C3 Teachers Inquiry Challenge called on teachers to submit their best ideas for inquiries, and boy did folks have some good ideas. From over 50 entries, twelve amazing inquiries were selected as Inquiry Challenge winners. We are publishing these inquiries in our premier inquiry collection at http://www.c3teachers.org/inquiries

The purpose of the challenge was to support and reward social studies educators using the Inquiry Design Model™ (IDM). This challenge was co-sponsored by C3 Teachers and the Social Studies Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction (SSACI) Collaborative, which is part of the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO). Check out the winning inquiries and, please spread the word about  #c3teachers and #inquirychallenge.

appalachia_featuredAppalachia – See More Here

This elementary inquiry by Lisa Salyer in Johnson County Schools in Kentucky leads students through an investigation of water access in the Middle East using various sources that consider geographical, political and economic issues. By investigating the compelling question, students examine the geography of the region, including environmental and demographic relationships, the ecological impact of accessing water, and the subsequent political conflicts over control of natural resources. By completing this inquiry, students begin to understand issues revolving around access and control of resources, such as the consequences of power struggles that befall countries with limited access to water resources.

costofwater_featured

Cost of Water – See More Here 

This 7th grade inquiry from Ginny McAnear in Cobb County School District in Georgia and asks What’s the greatest cost of water? and leads students through an investigation of water access in the Middle East using various sources that consider geographical, political and economic issues. By investigating the compelling question, students examine the geography of the region, including environmental and demographic relationships, the ecological impact of accessing water, and the subsequent political conflicts over control of natural resources. By completing this inquiry, students begin to understand issues revolving around access and control of resources, such as the consequences of power struggles that befall countries with limited access to water resources.

holocaust_featuredThe Holocaust and Bystanders – See More Here

The 11th grade inquiry from Laura Piner in Pitt County Schools in North Carolina examines the compelling question, Are bystanders guilty too? The inquiry focused on actions made by ordinary people during the Holocaust: to participate, to help, or to stand by. By investigating the compelling question “Are bystanders guilty too?” students evaluate the different routes of action/inaction, as well as the associated risks. The formative performance tasks build on knowledge and skills through the course of the inquiry and help students recognize different perspectives in order to better understand the ways in which everyday people had choices to either help or be complicit in persecution. Students create an evidence-based argument about whether bystanders should be seen as guilty after considering the actions of persecutors and rescuers, and assessing viewpoints concerning bystander responsibility in a totalitarian regime.

papermaps_primary

Paper Maps – See More Here

This kindergarten inquiry from Mary McDonnell in Cobb County School District leads students through an investigation of electronic and paper maps as representations of the physical world. In examining the different ways in which the two mediums reflect place and positionality, students should consider the utility and relative value of different geographic representations. Through interaction with the formative performance tasks and featured sources, students build their knowledge and understanding so that they are able to develop an argument that answers the compelling question “Do We Still Need Paper Maps?